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Literatur und Schriften


Diporiphora GRAY, 1842

Australische Bodenagamen

GRAY, J.E. (1842): Description of some hitherto unrecorded species of Australian reptiles and batrachians.- Zoological Miscellany 2: 51-57 (London: Treuttel, Würtz & Co).

MELVILLE, J., DATE, K.S., HORNER, P. & P. DOUGHTY (2019): Taxonomic revision of dragon lizards in the genus Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) from the Australian monsoonal tropics. – Mem. Mus. Victoria, 78: 23–55.

The Australian dragon lizard genus Diporiphora currently comprises 21 species based on genetic and morphological evidence, with 11 of these species occurring in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Diporiphora are climbing lizards that are found on either trees, grasses or rocks, with usually only subtle morphological differences to distinguish between species. Since the last taxonomic treatment of this genus in northern Australia over 40 years ago, species delimitation using genetic techniques has clarified the number of lineages and increased collections from recent surveys have significantly broadened the distributions of these taxa. However, no formal taxonomic assessments have been undertaken to redefine species, including the many lineages that represent undescribed species. Currently, there are seven species of Diporiphora with vast distributions across northern Australia and a broad and variable set of morphological characteristics that make species identification challenging, even for experienced field workers. Here, we provide a comprehensive taxonomic treatment of Diporiphora species across northern Australia based on previously published genetic data and morphological examination of voucher specimens. Our analyses demonstrate that these broadly distributed taxa actually comprise multiple, often allopatric, species, with especially high diversity in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. We redescribe nine previously described species and describe five new species of Diporiphora based on historical types, newly collected material and older museum vouchers. In the D. australis species group, we resurrect D. jugularis Macleay from synonomy. In the D. bennettii species group, we synonomise D. arnhemica Storr with D. albilabris Storr, and raise to full species the latter and D. sobria Storr. In addition, we describe as new a wide-ranging saxicoline species previously attributed to D. bennettii Gray. In the D. bilineata species group, we resurrect D. margaretae Storr from synonomy with D. magna Storr and describe three new species. Lastly, we describe a species from the northwest Kimberley that is more closely related to an arid zone radiation. The revision of the northern Diporiphora dragons here stabilises the taxonomy, redefines many species distributions and reveals many new species. Further work on Diporiphora includes further surveys to better understand distributions and habitat preferences and continue to refine their evolutionary history and biogeography in northern Australia.

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.


Diporiphora adductus DOUGHTY, KEALLEY & MELVILLE, 2012

Carnarvon Dragon

DOUGHTY, P.,  KEALLEY, L. & J. MELVILLE (2012): Taxonomic assessment of Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) dragon lizards from the western arid zone of Australia. – Zootaxa, 3518: 1-24.

Members of the genus Diporiphora are slender perching agamid lizards from Australasia, with a conservative morphology and some outstanding taxonomic issues. Here we assess morphological variation in the morphologically similar D. pin-dan, D. valens, and D. winneckei from the western deserts of Australia. A reassessment of morphological differences that included the presence or absence of a gular fold, revealed D. pindan to be much more widely distributed than previously thought, occurring as far south as the northern Pilbara and east to the Tanami Desert. Examination of D. valens specimens revealed a north-south split within the Pilbara, with specimens conspecific with the types from the Hamersley Range in the southern Pilbara, whereas recently collected specimens from the Chichester and Roebourne regions in the northern Pilbara differ morphologically, and are described as a new species. Examination of the type of D. winneckei and topotypic material indicates that populations referable to this species are confined to the eastern arid zone. The isolated far western population of ‘D. winneckei’ from the Carnarvon Basin differs in morphology from the eastern arid zone D. winneckei and is described as a new species. The western arid zone ‘D. winneckei’ is also morphologically distinctive from the eastern arid zone D. winneckei and is described as a new species. We also redescribe D. pindan, D. valens, and D. winneckei, and return Caimanops amphiboluroides to Diporiphora based on the results of previous genetic studies.


Diporiphora albilabris STORR,1974

White-lipped Two-line Dragon

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo


Diporiphora ameliae EMMOTT, COUPER, MELVILLE & CHAPPLE, 2012


COUPER, P., MELVILLE, J., EMMOTT, A. & S.N.J. CHAPPLE (2012): A new species of Diporiphora from the Goneaway Tablelands of Western Queensland. Zootaxa 3556: 39–54.

Australia’s agamid genus Diporiphora is speciose and widespread, however, there remain significant taxonomic uncertainties within this group. Field collections across the range of Diporiphora continue to uncover undocumented morphological and ecological variation. A new morpho-type was collected from hard pebbly soils on Valetta Station, western Queensland, providing ample data for the description of a new species (Diporiphora ameliae sp. nov.). We undertook a morphological study, integrated with a comprehensive genetic study to provide the phylogenetic placement and distinctiveness of the new species. Although superficially similar to Diporiphora winneckei, the new species is characterised by well developed ventral body patterns consisting of four longitudinal grey stripes on a cream background and three distinctive dark V-shaped markings that converge anteriorly on the throat and gular area. Molecular data is presented incorporating a ~1200 bp of the mtDNA protein-coding gene ND2 and five flanking tRNAs for 58 new sequences and 53 previously published sequences. Phylogenetic analyses of the molecular data strongly support the new species as an independent evolutionary lineage within Diporiphora. In addition, the molecular data also showed that there is far greater diversity in Diporiphora winneckei sensu lato than was anticipated. Our results clearly indicate that there are at least three independent evolutionary lineages of D. winneckei-like dragons.


Diporiphora amphiboluroides (LUCAS & FROST, 1902)

Mulga Dragon

LUCAS, A.H.S. & C. FROST (1902): Descriptions of some new lizards from Western Australia. - Proc. R. Soc. Vict. 15: 76-79.

PIANKA, E.R. (2013): Notes on the natural history of the rarely recorded agamid lizard Caimanops amphiboluroides in Western Australia. – Western Australian Naturalist, 29: 99-102.

Ecological data on the seldom encountered and little known agamid Caimanops amphiboluroides are presented. Caimanops is arboreal and is usually associated with mulga trees and fence posts. Average height above ground of 10 active lizards was 79.5 cm. Average body temperature of 13 active lizards was 36.6°C. These lizards are dietary specialists, feeding mostly on termites. Average clutch size is 12 (N=2).

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora australis STEINDACHNER,1867

Eastern two-line Dragon

DE VIS, C.W. (1884): On new species of Australian lizards. – Proceedings of the Ropyal Society of Queensland, 1: 97-100.

KUTT, A.S. & J.E. KEMP (1997): Common myna Acridotherus tristis preys on two-lined dragons Diporiphora australis. – Sunbird, 27 (1): 26-28.


Diporiphora bennettii GRAY, 1845

Robust Two-line Dragon

GRAY, J.E. (1845): Catalogue of the specimens of lizards in the collection of the British Museum. Trustees of die British Museum/Edward Newman, London: xxvii + 289 pp.


Diporiphora bilineata GRAY, 1842

Northern Two-line Dragon, Two-Lined Dragon

GRAY, J.E. (1842): Description of some hitherto unrecorded species of Australian reptiles and batrachians.- Zoological Miscellany 2: 51-57 (London: Treuttel, Würtz & Co).

MARYAN, B. (1995): A note on colour change in Diporiphora bilineata. – Herpetofauna, Sydney, 25 (2): 61.


Diporiphora convergens STORR, 1974

Crystal Creek Two-line Dragon

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora gracilis MELVILLE, DATE, HORNER & DOUGHTY, 2019

Gracile Two-lined Dragon

MELVILLE, J., SMITH DATE, K.L., HORNER, P. & P. DOUGHTY (2019): Taxonomic revision of dragon lizards in the genus Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) from the Australian monsoonal tropics. Memoirs of Museum Victoria 78: 23–55.

The Australian dragon lizard genus Diporiphora currently comprises 21 species based on genetic and morphological evidence, with 11 of these species occurring in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Diporiphora are climbing lizards that are found on either trees, grasses or rocks, with usually only subtle morphological differences to distinguish between species. Since the last taxonomic treatment of this genus in northern Australia over 40 years ago, species delimitation using genetic techniques has clarified the number of lineages and increased collections from recent surveys have significantly broadened the distributions of these taxa. However, no formal taxonomic assessments have been undertaken to redefine species, including the many lineages that represent undescribed species. Currently, there are seven species of Diporiphora with vast distributions across northern Australia and a broad and variable set of morphological characteristics that make species identification challenging, even for experienced field workers. Here, we provide a comprehensive taxonomic treatment of Diporiphora species across northern Australia based on previously published genetic data and morphological examination of voucher specimens. Our analyses demonstrate that these broadly distributed taxa actually comprise multiple, often allopatric, species, with especially high diversity in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. We redescribe nine previously described species and describe five new species of Diporiphora based on historical types, newly collected material and older museum vouchers. In the D. australis species group, we resurrect D. jugularis Macleay from synonomy. In the D. bennettii species group, we synonomise D. arnhemica Storr with D. albilabris Storr, and raise to full species the latter and D. sobria Storr. In addition, we describe as new a wide-ranging saxicoline species previously attributed to D. bennettii Gray. In the D. bilineata species group, we resurrect D. margaretae Storr from synonomy with D. magna Storr and describe three new species. Lastly, we describe a species from the northwest Kimberley that is more closely related to an arid zone radiation.The revision of the northern Diporiphora dragons here stabilises the taxonomy, redefines many species distributions and reveals many new species. Further work on Diporiphora includes further surveys to better understand distributions and habitat preferences and continue to refine their evolutionary history and biogeography in northern Australia.


Diporiphora granulifera MELVILLE, DATE, HORNER & DOUGHTY, 2019

Granulated two-lined Dragon

MELVILLE, J., SMITH DATE, K.L., HORNER, P. & P. DOUGHTY (2019): Taxonomic revision of dragon lizards in the genus Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) from the Australian monsoonal tropics. Memoirs of Museum Victoria 78: 23–55.

The Australian dragon lizard genus Diporiphora currently comprises 21 species based on genetic and morphological evidence, with 11 of these species occurring in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Diporiphora are climbing lizards that are found on either trees, grasses or rocks, with usually only subtle morphological differences to distinguish between species. Since the last taxonomic treatment of this genus in northern Australia over 40 years ago, species delimitation using genetic techniques has clarified the number of lineages and increased collections from recent surveys have significantly broadened the distributions of these taxa. However, no formal taxonomic assessments have been undertaken to redefine species, including the many lineages that represent undescribed species. Currently, there are seven species of Diporiphora with vast distributions across northern Australia and a broad and variable set of morphological characteristics that make species identification challenging, even for experienced field workers. Here, we provide a comprehensive taxonomic treatment of Diporiphora species across northern Australia based on previously published genetic data and morphological examination of voucher specimens. Our analyses demonstrate that these broadly distributed taxa actually comprise multiple, often allopatric, species, with especially high diversity in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. We redescribe nine previously described species and describe five new species of Diporiphora based on historical types, newly collected material and older museum vouchers. In the D. australis species group, we resurrect D. jugularis Macleay from synonomy. In the D. bennettii species group, we synonomise D. arnhemica Storr with D. albilabris Storr, and raise to full species the latter and D. sobria Storr. In addition, we describe as new a wide-ranging saxicoline species previously attributed to D. bennettii Gray. In the D. bilineata species group, we resurrect D. margaretae Storr from synonomy with D. magna Storr and describe three new species. Lastly, we describe a species from the northwest Kimberley that is more closely related to an arid zone radiation.The revision of the northern Diporiphora dragons here stabilises the taxonomy, redefines many species distributions and reveals many new species. Further work on Diporiphora includes further surveys to better understand distributions and habitat preferences and continue to refine their evolutionary history and biogeography in northern Australia.


Diporiphora jugularis MACLEAY, 1877

Black-throated two-pored dragon

MACLEAY, W. (1877): The lizards of the Chevert Expedition. - Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales, 2: 60-69; 97-104.


Diporiphora lalliae STORR, 1974

Lally´s Two-line Dragon

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora linga HOUSTON, 1977

Pink Two-line Dragon

HOUSTON, T.F. (1977): A new species of Diporiphora from South Australia and geographic variation in D. winneckei Lucas & Frost (Lacertilia: Agamidae). – Transactions R. Soc. S. Aust., 101 (8): 199-205.


Diporiphora magna STORR,1974

Yellow-sided Two-line Dragon

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora margaretae STORR,1974


STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora nobbi (WITTEN, 1972)


EDWARDS, D.L. & J. MELVILLE (2011): Extensive phylogeographic and morphological diversity in Diporiphora nobbi (Agamidae) leads to a taxonomic review and a new species description. – Journal of Herpetology, 45 (4); 530-546.

Morphological and molecular information is invaluable in the description of cryptic diversity and the evolutionary processes driving diversification within closely related species that exhibit morphological homoplasy. We present a distribution-wide data set consisting of both molecular and morphological information, providing a taxonomic revision of the Diporiphora nobbi species group, and develop preliminary hypotheses regarding the evolutionary history of D. nobbi. We show deep molecular divergence between D. nobbi and a newly described sister lineage associated with divergence in meristic characters. Our molecular data also show large divergences among subclades within nominate D. nobbi associated with different habitats rather than specific biogeographc barriers. We further discuss potential diversification mechanisms within the D. nobbi species group.

MORLEY, T.P. (1992): Eggs and incubation in the Australian lizards Amphibolurus nobbi and Eremiascincus richardsoni. – Trans. Roy. Soc. S. Aust., 116 (3/4): 147-148.

RAUHALA, M. (1993): Distribution and habitat of the Nobby Dragon Amphibolurus nobbi in the Australian Capital. - Territory ACT Govt., Dept. of the Environment, Land and Planning, ACT Parks and Conservation Service, Technical report 5.

WITTEN, G.J. (1972): A new species of Amphibolurus from eastern Australia. – Herpetologica, 28: 191-195.

WITTEN, G.J. (1974): Population movements of the Agamid lizard Amphibolurus nobbi. – Australian Zool., 18 (2): 129-132.

WITTEN, G.J. (1978): A triploid male individual Amphibolurus nobbi nobbi Witten (Lacertilia: Agamidae). – Australian Zoology, 19: 305-308.


Diporiphora pallida MELVILLE, DATE, HORNER & DOUGHTY, 2019

Paled two-pored Dragon

MELVILLE, J., SMITH DATE, K.L., HORNER, P. & P. DOUGHTY (2019): Taxonomic revision of dragon lizards in the genus Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) from the Australian monsoonal tropics. Memoirs of Museum Victoria 78: 23–55.

The Australian dragon lizard genus Diporiphora currently comprises 21 species based on genetic and morphological evidence, with 11 of these species occurring in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Diporiphora are climbing lizards that are found on either trees, grasses or rocks, with usually only subtle morphological differences to distinguish between species. Since the last taxonomic treatment of this genus in northern Australia over 40 years ago, species delimitation using genetic techniques has clarified the number of lineages and increased collections from recent surveys have significantly broadened the distributions of these taxa. However, no formal taxonomic assessments have been undertaken to redefine species, including the many lineages that represent undescribed species. Currently, there are seven species of Diporiphora with vast distributions across northern Australia and a broad and variable set of morphological characteristics that make species identification challenging, even for experienced field workers. Here, we provide a comprehensive taxonomic treatment of Diporiphora species across northern Australia based on previously published genetic data and morphological examination of voucher specimens. Our analyses demonstrate that these broadly distributed taxa actually comprise multiple, often allopatric, species, with especially high diversity in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. We redescribe nine previously described species and describe five new species of Diporiphora based on historical types, newly collected material and older museum vouchers. In the D. australis species group, we resurrect D. jugularis Macleay from synonomy. In the D. bennettii species group, we synonomise D. arnhemica Storr with D. albilabris Storr, and raise to full species the latter and D. sobria Storr. In addition, we describe as new a wide-ranging saxicoline species previously attributed to D. bennettii Gray. In the D. bilineata species group, we resurrect D. margaretae Storr from synonomy with D. magna Storr and describe three new species. Lastly, we describe a species from the northwest Kimberley that is more closely related to an arid zone radiation.The revision of the northern Diporiphora dragons here stabilises the taxonomy, redefines many species distributions and reveals many new species. Further work on Diporiphora includes further surveys to better understand distributions and habitat preferences and continue to refine their evolutionary history and biogeography in northern Australia


Diporiphora paraconvergens DOUGHTY, KEALLEY & MELVILLE, 2012

Grey-striped Western Desert Dragon

DOUGHTY, P.,  KEALLEY, L. & J. MELVILLE (2012): Taxonomic assessment of Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) dragon lizards from the western arid zone of Australia. – Zootaxa, 3518: 1-24.

Members of the genus Diporiphora are slender perching agamid lizards from Australasia, with a conservative morphology and some outstanding taxonomic issues. Here we assess morphological variation in the morphologically similar D. pin-dan, D. valens, and D. winneckei from the western deserts of Australia. A reassessment of morphological differences that included the presence or absence of a gular fold, revealed D. pindan to be much more widely distributed than previously thought, occurring as far south as the northern Pilbara and east to the Tanami Desert. Examination of D. valens specimens revealed a north-south split within the Pilbara, with specimens conspecific with the types from the Hamersley Range in the southern Pilbara, whereas recently collected specimens from the Chichester and Roebourne regions in the northern Pilbara differ morphologically, and are described as a new species. Examination of the type of D. winneckei and topotypic material indicates that populations referable to this species are confined to the eastern arid zone. The isolated far western population of ‘D. winneckei’ from the Carnarvon Basin differs in morphology from the eastern arid zone D. winneckei and is described as a new species. The western arid zone ‘D. winneckei’ is also morphologically distinctive from the eastern arid zone D. winneckei and is described as a new species. We also redescribe D. pindan, D. valens, and D. winneckei, and return Caimanops amphiboluroides to Diporiphora based on the results of previous genetic studies.

PIANKA, E.R. (2013): Notes on the ecology and natural history of two uncommon arboreal agamid lizards Diporiphora paraconvergens and Lophognathus longirostris in the Great Victoria desert of Western Australia. – Western Australian Naturalist, 29: 77-84.


Diporiphora perplexa MELVILLE, DATE, HORNER & DOUGHTY, 2019

Kimberley Rock Dragon

MELVILLE, J., SMITH DATE, K.L., HORNER, P. & P. DOUGHTY (2019): Taxonomic revision of dragon lizards in the genus Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) from the Australian monsoonal tropics. Memoirs of Museum Victoria 78: 23–55.

The Australian dragon lizard genus Diporiphora currently comprises 21 species based on genetic and morphological evidence, with 11 of these species occurring in the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. Diporiphora are climbing lizards that are found on either trees, grasses or rocks, with usually only subtle morphological differences to distinguish between species. Since the last taxonomic treatment of this genus in northern Australia over 40 years ago, species delimitation using genetic techniques has clarified the number of lineages and increased collections from recent surveys have significantly broadened the distributions of these taxa. However, no formal taxonomic assessments have been undertaken to redefine species, including the many lineages that represent undescribed species. Currently, there are seven species of Diporiphora with vast distributions across northern Australia and a broad and variable set of morphological characteristics that make species identification challenging, even for experienced field workers. Here, we provide a comprehensive taxonomic treatment of Diporiphora species across northern Australia based on previously published genetic data and morphological examination of voucher specimens. Our analyses demonstrate that these broadly distributed taxa actually comprise multiple, often allopatric, species, with especially high diversity in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. We redescribe nine previously described species and describe five new species of Diporiphora based on historical types, newly collected material and older museum vouchers. In the D. australis species group, we resurrect D. jugularis Macleay from synonomy. In the D. bennettii species group, we synonomise D. arnhemica Storr with D. albilabris Storr, and raise to full species the latter and D. sobria Storr. In addition, we describe as new a wide-ranging saxicoline species previously attributed to D. bennettii Gray. In the D. bilineata species group, we resurrect D. margaretae Storr from synonomy with D. magna Storr and describe three new species. Lastly, we describe a species from the northwest Kimberley that is more closely related to an arid zone radiation.The revision of the northern Diporiphora dragons here stabilises the taxonomy, redefines many species distributions and reveals many new species. Further work on Diporiphora includes further surveys to better understand distributions and habitat preferences and continue to refine their evolutionary history and biogeography in northern Australia


Diporiphora phaeospinosa EDWARDS & MELVILLE, 2011


EDWARDS, D.L. & J. MELVILLE (2011): Extensive phylogeographic and morphological diversity in Diporiphora nobbi (Agamidae) leads to a taxonomic review and a new species description. – Journal of Herpetology, 45 (4); 530-546.

Morphological and molecular information is invaluable in the description of cryptic diversity and the evolutionary processes driving diversification within closely related species that exhibit morphological homoplasy. We present a distribution-wide data set consisting of both molecular and morphological information, providing a taxonomic revision of the Diporiphora nobbi species group, and develop preliminary hypotheses regarding the evolutionary history of D. nobbi. We show deep molecular divergence between D. nobbi and a newly described sister lineage associated with divergence in meristic characters. Our molecular data also show large divergences among subclades within nominate D. nobbi associated with different habitats rather than specific biogeographc barriers. We further discuss potential diversification mechanisms within the D. nobbi species group.


Diporiphora pindan STORR,1980

Pindan Two-line Dragon

McALPIN, S. (1996): A range extension for the dragon Diporiphora pindan. – Herpetofauna, Sydney, 26 (1): 47.

STORR, G.M. (1980): Two new Diporiphora (Lacertilia, Agamidae) from Western Australia. – Rec. West. Aust. Mus., 7 (2): 255-263.

Diporiphora reginae GLAUERT,1959

Plain-backed Two-line Dragon

GLAUERT, L. (1959): A new Agamid lizard from Queen Victoria Springs, Western Australia (Diporiphora reginae, sp. nov.). – Proc. R. zool. Soc. N.S.W., 1959: 10.


Diporiphora sobria STORR, 1974

Northern savannah two-pored dragon

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora superba STORR, 1974

Superb Two-line Dragon

STORR, G.M. (1974): Agamid lizards of the genera Caimanops, Physignathus and Diporiphora in Western Australia and Northern Territory. – Records W. Aust. Mus., 3 (2): 121-146.

Caimanopsgen. novo is proposed for Diporiphora amphiboluroides Lucas & Frost. The following species and subspecies of Physignathus and Diporiphora are studied: P. longirostris (Boulenger), P. temporalis (Giinther), P. g. gilberti (Gray), P. g. centralis Loveridge, D. convergens nov., D. a. albilabris nov., D. a. sobria nov., D. b. bennettii (GraY), D. b. arnhemica nov., D. magna nov., D. lalliae nov., D. reginae Glauert, D. winneckei Lucas & Frost, D. b. bilineata Gray, D. b. margaretae nov., and D. superba novo.


Diporiphora valens STORR, 1980

Pilbara Two-line Dragon

MARYAN, B. & J. TURPIN (2012): Natural history notes on two Pilbara endemic lizards, Diporiphora valens and Varanus bushi, with brief comments on survey methodology. - The Western Australian Naturalist, 28: 274-279.

STORR, G.M. (1980): Two new Diporiphora (Lacertilia, Agamidae) from Western Australia. – Rec. West. Aust. Mus., 7 (2): 255-263.


Diporiphora vescus DOUGHTY, KEALLEY & MELVILLE, 2012

Northern Pilbara Tree Dragon

DOUGHTY, P.,  KEALLEY, L. & J. MELVILLE (2012): Taxonomic assessment of Diporiphora (Reptilia: Agamidae) dragon lizards from the western arid zone of Australia. – Zootaxa, 3518: 1-24.

Members of the genus Diporiphora are slender perching agamid lizards from Australasia, with a conservative morphology and some outstanding taxonomic issues. Here we assess morphological variation in the morphologically similar D. pin-dan, D. valens, and D. winneckei from the western deserts of Australia. A reassessment of morphological differences that included the presence or absence of a gular fold, revealed D. pindan to be much more widely distributed than previously thought, occurring as far south as the northern Pilbara and east to the Tanami Desert. Examination of D. valens specimens revealed a north-south split within the Pilbara, with specimens conspecific with the types from the Hamersley Range in the southern Pilbara, whereas recently collected specimens from the Chichester and Roebourne regions in the northern Pilbara differ morphologically, and are described as a new species. Examination of the type of D. winneckei and topotypic material indicates that populations referable to this species are confined to the eastern arid zone. The isolated far western population of ‘D. winneckei’ from the Carnarvon Basin differs in morphology from the eastern arid zone D. winneckei and is described as a new species. The western arid zone ‘D. winneckei’ is also morphologically distinctive from the eastern arid zone D. winneckei and is described as a new species. We also redescribe D. pindan, D. valens, and D. winneckei, and return Caimanops amphiboluroides to Diporiphora based on the results of previous genetic studies.


Diporiphora winneckei LUCAS & FROST,1896

Canegrass Two-line Dragon

HOUSTON, T.F. (1977): A new species of Diporiphora from South Australia and geographic variation in D. winneckei Lucas & Frost (Lacertilia: Agamidae). – Transactions R. Soc. S. Aust., 101 (8): 199-205.

LUCAS, A.H S. & C. FROST (1896): Further preliminary notice of certain new species of lizards from central Australia. - Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria, 8: 1-4.

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