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DGHT-AG Agamen

Literatur und Schriften


Acanthocercus

BAIG, K.J. & W. BÖHME (1997): Partition of the ‚Stellio’ group of Agama into two distinct genera: Acanthocercus FITZINGER, 1843, and Laudakia GRAY, 1845 (Sauria: Agamidae). – In: Böhme, Bischoff & Ziegler (eds.): Proc. 8th Ord. Gen. Meet. Soc. Europ. Herp., 1997: 21-26.

In his unpublished PhD thesis, MOODY (1980) proposed to resurrect six distinct genera from the synonymy of the collective genus Agama (sensu lato: e.g. WERMUTH 1967). These were Agama (s.str.), Trapelus, Pseudotrapelus, Brachysaura, Xenagama and Stellio. Apart from the fact that the content of Stellio (sensu MOODY I.e.) is still under debate, the name Stellio LAURENTI, 1768 is not at all available (cf. BAIG & BOHME 1991, BAIG 1992, LEVITON et al. 1992, HENLE 1995). BAIG & BOHME (I.e.) proposed to preliminarily use Laudakia GRAY, 1845 (type: L. tuberculatd) for these so-called whorl-tailed agamas, and were followed by LEVITON et al. (1992). In his comprehensive revision of the "Stellio" group of the former collective genus Agama the senior author (BAIG 1992) analyzed a very rich material in respect to 54 morphological characters and complemented this information with literature data on anatomical, karyotypic, and biochemical evidence. To discuss this evidence in a phylogenetic and zoogeographical context, is the aim of the present paper.

WAGNER, P. (2010): Preliminary studies of the genus Acanthocercus (Sauria: Agamidae) in the context of the arid corridor in Africa. - Abstracts of the Second International Symposium on Agamid Lizards «DeAgamis2». - Current Studies in Herpetology, 10 (3/4): 156-157.

Acanthocercus adramitanus (ANDERSON, 1896)

Hadramautagame / Anderson´s Rock Agama

ABO-TAIRA, A.M., ZAHER, M.M., AMER, M.A., BASSIOUNI, W.M. & M.A. KENAY (1993): Further aspects of lacertilian alimentary tract: histochemical typing in the mucosal coat of Agama adramitana (family Agamidae). – Proceedings of the Zoological Society A.R. Egypt, 24: 169-181.

ADAMSON, M.L. & A.K. NASHER (1984): Pharyngodonids (Oxyuroidea: Nematoda of Agama adramitana) in Saudi Arabia with notes on Parapharyngodon. – Canadian Journal of Zoology, 623: 2600-2609.

ANDERSON J. (1896): Description Acanthocercus adramitanus.  - In: ”A Contribution to the Herpetology of Arabia, with a preliminary list of the Reptiles and Batrachians of Egypt”. London, R. H. Porter, 124 pp.

GROSSMANN, W. (2012): Acanthocercus adramitanus (ANDERSON, 1896). – Sauria, Berlin, 34 (4): 1-2.

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1954): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über die Rassenkreise Agama cyanogaster und Agama atricollis. – Senckenbergiana biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35: 137-146.

NECAS, P. & M. BARTS (1994): Die Hadramautagame Acanthocercus adramitanus (ANDERSON, 1896) – Systematik, Biologie und Vermehrung im Terrarium. – Sauria, Berlin, 16 (1): 3-9. (00.342)

Abstract:
The Agamid lizard Acanthocercus adramitanus (ANDERSON, 1896) is portrayed in detail summarizinh its systematic history, describing its morphology, colouration, sexual dimorphism, distribution, population density, ecology, sociology, husbundry, and breeding. Various aspects of this specific lizard and of the family in general are discussed and analyzed. Provided appropriate conditions, this species does well under captive circumstances.

PETERS, G. (1982): Eine neue Wirtelschwanzagame aus Ostafrika (Agamidae: Agama). – Mitt. Zool. Mus. Berlin, 58 (2): 265-268.


Acanthocercus annectens (BLANFORD, 1870)


BLANFORD, W.T. (1870): Description of Anthocercus annectens. – In: “Observations of the geology and zoology of Abyssinia, made 1867-68”. McMillan (London), xii + 487 pp.


Acanthocercus atricollis (SMITH, 1849)

Blaukehlagame / Black-necked Agama, Blue-throated Agama, Southern Tree Agama

BROADLEY, S. (2008): Acanthocercus atricollis (A. Smith, 1849) Southern Tree Agama. Acacia gum diet. – Afr. Herp News, 46: 15.

BURGERS, J. (1951): Agama atricollis, Woestijnagaam. – Lacerta, 10 (1): 6-7.

COWLES, R.B. (1956): Notes on natural history of a South African Agamid lizard. – Herpetologica, 12: 297-302.

CURRY-LINDAHL, K. (1979): Thermal ecology of the tree agama (Agama atricollis) in Zaire with a review of heat tolerance in reptiles. – Journal of Zoology, London, 188: 185-220.

Territorial behaviour and thermal ecology in relation to heat resistance in the tree agama (or black-necked agama), Agama atricollis, were studied during two expeditions 1951-2 and 1958-9 in eastern Zaire (the former Belgian Congo) in an area just south of the equator. The maximum temperature tolerance of A. atricollis lies within the range of 4343,9"C, but the maximum voluntary tolerance is somewhat lower, 425°C. Territorial males. retreating from their guard posts after having exposed themselves to direct sunlight during the hottest hours of the day for 10-16 minutes, reach body temperatures of 42.242.5"C before they retreat into the shade. In shady places it takes the males from 14 to 21 minutes to cool down to 38.1-39.9"C, at which body temperatures they return to the lookout within the territory. The territoriality in A. atricollisand several other species of the same genus, as well as other diurnal lizards with similar behaviour, may have contributed, through selection, to the evolution of their extraordinary resistance to substratum heat and direct sunlight. In an attempt to review and compare maximum voluntary body temperatures (MVT), critical thermal maxima (CTM) and lethal body temperatures (LT) in reptiles with pronounced heat resistance, data have been compiled for 96 species representing 11 families and six continents. The family Agamidae appears to be the most adapted to high body temperatures with 13 species (of 18 species tested) having body temperatures above 43°C in comparison with six species in Iguanidae (of 33 species tested), four in Gekkonidae (of nine species tested) and so forth. Agamids, iguanids, teeids and geckos, in hot environments of five continents, have evolved along the same lines behaviourally and physiologically as responses to territoriality in combination with high temperatures. This feature may be of adaptive significance. This paper also reports on body temperatures, obtained in Africa from free-living individuals of seven other species of the genera Agama and Mabuya, namely A. atra, A. colonorrim, A. hispida, A. planiceps, Mabuya quinquetaeniata, M. maculilabris and M. striata.

FITZSIMMONS, W.M. (1964): Abbreviata nyassae n. Sp. (Physalopteridae. Spiruroidea) from Agama atricollis in Nyassaland. – Journal of Helminthology, 38: 21-24.

GOLDBERG, S:R. & C.R. BURSEY (2005): Acanthocercus atricollis (blue-headed tree agama). Endoparasites. – Herpetological Review, 36: 169-170.

GOLDBERG, S.R., BURSEY, C.R., GREENBAUM, E. & C. KUSAMBA (2012): Gastrointestinal Helminths of the Black-necked Agama, Acanthocercus atricollis (Squamata: Agamidae), from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. – Comparative Parasitology, 79 (1): 164-166.

A helminthological examination of the black-necked agama, Acanthocercus atricollis, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo revealed the presence of one species of Digenea, Mesocoelium monas; one species of Cestoda, Oochoristica truncata; and three species of Nematoda, adults of Pseudabbreviata amaniensis and Strongyluris gigas and one ascarid larva. Strongyluris gigas had the highest prevalence (87%) and P. amaniensis had the highest mean intensity (38.7 ± 52.6 SD). All are generalist helminths that infect lizard species but represent new parasite records for A. atricollis.

GRUBERMANN, M.(2013): Einige fotografische Beobachtungen an Agamen in Kenia, Tansania, Malawi, Südafrika und Namibia. – Iguana, 26 (1): 23-33.

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1953): Die Korrelation von Verhaltensphysiologie und Farbphysiologie bei Agama cyanogaster atricollis. – Zeitschrift für Tierpsychologie, 10: 169-180.

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1954): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über den Rassenkreis Agama cyanogaster und A. atricollis (Teil 1). – Senck. biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35 (3/4): 137-146.

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1954): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über die Rassenkreise Agama cyanogaster und A. atricollis. 2. Die Unterarten von Agama atricollis. – Senck. biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35: 132-146.

MENDES, A.J. (2006): Some aspects of nest-digging and egg-laying behaviour in the arboreal agamid lizard, Agama atricollis Smith, 1849 (= Acanthocercus atricollis Smith, 1849). – Herp. Bull., (98): 12-22.

PIETERSEN, E. & D. PIETERSEN (2001): Acanthocercus atricollis Southern Tree Agama. – African Herp News, 33: 14.

REANEY, L.T. & M.J. WHITING (2002): Life on a limb: ecology of the tree agama (Acanthocercus a. atricollis) in southern Africa. – Journal of Zoology, London, 257: 439-448.

REANEY, L.T. & M.J. WHITING (2003): Picking a tree: habitat use by the tree agama, Acanthocercus atricollis atricollis, in South Africa. – African Zoology, 38 (2): 273-278.

REANEY, L.T. & M.J. WHITING (2003): Are female tree agamas (Acanthocercus atricollis atricollis) turned on by males or resources? – Ethol. Ecol. Evol., 15: 19-30.

We examined the relative importance of male and home range quality on female-male spatial overlap in the tree agama, Acanthocercus atricollis atricollis. Specifically, we asked whether males in good condition had the greatest spatial overlap with females, whether these same males have the best home ranges, or whether females are simply occupying areas with the best habitat and highest food abundance. Tree structure and prey abundance were used as measures of male home range quality, and male snout-vent length and male body condition were used as indices of male quality. Males had significantly larger home ranges compared to females and female-male overlap was common, while male-male overlap was marginal in a few cases (n = 3). Contrary to prediction, larger males did not occupy larger areas and home range size was not influenced by prey abundance. However, there was significant variation in prey availability between male areas. Female-male overlap was linked to prey abundance in male home ranges, possibly because of the direct influence it has on female fitness. However, several high quality males with high spatial overlap with females also had relatively high prey abundance. Male quality may well be linked to resource availability, but small sample size requires a cautionary interpretation.

SMITH, A. (1849): Description of Acanthocercus atricollis. - In: “Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa. Reptilia”. Smith, Elder, and Co., London.

SCHMIDT, H. (1966): Agama atricollis subsp. inc. aus der Serengeti. – Salamandra, 2 (3): 57-68. (00.084)

SPAWLS, S. (2010): Acanthocercus atricollis. - The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T170364A6769386. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2010-4.RLTS.T170364A6769386.en

WAGNER, P. (2006): Agamen als Klimakonstrukteure. – Terraria, Münster, 2 (1): 44.

WAGNER, P., GREENBAUM, E., BAUER, A.M., KUSAMBA, C. & A.D. LEACHÉ (2018): Lifting the blue-headed veil – integrative taxonomy of the Acanthocercus atricollis species complex (Squamata: Agamidae). - African Journal of Herpetology, 2018.

We present the first integrative review of the African agamid lizard Acanthocercus atricollis, a broadly distributed species found from Ethiopia through East Africa to Angola and South Africa. Since the original description of the species approximately 170 years ago six subspecies have been described, mainly on the basis of coloration characters. Our study presents new morphological and genetic data, which together suggest that A. atricollis is a complex of multiple species. External morphological characters and cranial osteology support some of the taxonomic differentiation implied by coloration. We also provide complementary 16S rRNA mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data analysed in the context of species delimitation. Our integrated data support several systematic and taxonomic changes, including (1) Acanthocercus branchi is part of the A. atricollis complex, (2) the subspecies A. gregorii, A. minutus, A. ugandaensis, and A. kiwuensis merit species rank, (3) A. atricollis loveridgei is a synonym of A. a. gregorii, (4) Agama cyanocephalus, a former synonym of A. atricollis, is now recognized as full species distributed in Angola, Zambia and extreme northern Namibia. The distribution and diversity of the A. atricollis species complex supports the presence of a biogeographic arid corridor connecting eastern and southern Africa.

WHITING, J.M., CHETTY, K., TWINE, W. & P. CARAZO (2009): Impact of human disturbance and beliefs on the tree agama Acanthocercus atricollis atricollis in a South African communal settlement. – Oryx, 43: 586-590.
We investigated the effects of human disturbance and attitudes on the density of the tree agama Acanthocercus atricollis atricollis in a densely populated rural settlement in South Africa. In this environment agamas live on trees that are harvested for firewood or maintained for fruit production. We conducted visual encounter surveys of A. a. atricollis and interviewed local households to establish whether human attitudes and actions could affect tree agama populations. Although local residents viewed tree agamas negatively (50% of interviewees claimed to have killed an agama) and acted to exclude them from their environment, tree agama density in villages was higher than that of adjacent communal rangelands and than a previously reported density estimate in a nearby protected area. We suggest three major factors that could explain why tree agamas are favoured in this peri-urban landscape in the face of human persecution: firstly, predators such as snakes and raptors are likely to occur at a much lower density in periurban areas; secondly, their primary prey (insects) may be more abundant or accessible in this landscape; thirdly, they may experience less competition for resources.


Acanthocercus branchi WAGNER, GREENBAUM & BAUER, 2012


ANONYMOUS (2012): Eine neue Agamenart aus Sambia zu Ehren von Bill Branch. – TERRARIA/elaphe, 2012 (4): 73.

WAGNER, P., GREENBAUM, E. & A. BAUER (2012): A new species of Acanthocercus atricollis complex (Squamata: Agamidae) from Zambia. – Salamandra, 48 (1): 21-30.

In the course of working on a taxonomic revision of the Acanthocercus atricollis complex, we discovered a population from the Luangwa and Zambezi valleys in Zambia and adjacent Malawi that is morphologically and genetically distinct from all described taxa of this complex. This population is described as a new species on the basis of morphological characters, including indistinct transverse rows of enlarged scales on the body, a large black patch on the shoulders, and a different pholidosis. It is morphologically similar to A. a. gregorii and A. a. loveridgei, but seems to be more closely related to the former.


Acanthocercus cyanocephalus (FALK, 1925)

Falks Blaukehlagame / Falk's Blue-headed Tree Agama

FALK, K. (1925): Herpetologische Berichte aus Angola (Portugiesisch West-Afrika) [Herpetological reports from Angola (Portuguese West-Africa)]. - Blätter für Aquarien und Terrarienkunde, Stuttgart, 36: 81.


Acanthocercus cyanogaster (RÜPPELL, 1835)

CHIFUNDERA, K. (1988): Le Regime Alientaire du Lezard Tropical African Agama cyanogaster Ruppell, 1835 dans la Region de Lwiro, est du Zaire. – African Study Monographs, 8 (3): 165-172.

CURRY-LINDAHL, K. (1957): Behaviour of the tropical rock lizard Agama cyanogaster (Rüppel) in hot environments. – Ann. Soc. zool. Belg., 87: 45-74.

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1954): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über den Rassenkreis Agama cyanogaster und A. atricollis (Teil 1). – Senck. biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35 (3/4): 137-146.

RÜPPELL, E. (1835): Description of Acanthocercus cyanogaster. – In: “Neue Wirbelthiere zu der Fauna von Abyssinien gehörig, entdeckt und beschrieben”. Amphibien. S. Schmerber, Frankfurt a. M.

SOUTHGATE, B. (1970): Plasmodium (Sauramoeba) giganteum in Agama cyanogaster: a new host record. – Trans R. Soc. trop. Med. Hyg., 64: 12-13.


Falks Blaukehlagame / Falk's Blue-headed Tree Agama

FALK, K. (1925): Herpetologische Berichte aus Angola (Portugiesisch West-Afrika) [Herpetological reports from Angola (Portuguese West-Africa)]. - Blätter für Aquarien und Terrarienkunde, Stuttgart, 36: 81.


Acanthocercus gregorii (GÜNTHER, 1894)


Blaukehlagame / Blue-headed tree agama, Black-necked (Ridgeback) agama, Southern Tree Agama, Blue-throated Agama

GÜNTHER, A. (1894): Report on the collection of reptiles and fishes made by Dr. J. W. Gregory during his expedition to Mount Kenia [sic]. - Proc. Zool. Soc. London 1894: 84-91.


Acanthocercus guentherpetersi (LARGEN & SPAWLS, 2006)


LARGEN, M.J. & S. SPAWLS (2006): Lizards of Ethiopia (Reptilia Sauria): an annotated checklist, bibliography, gazetteer and identification krey. – Trop. Zool., Florence, 19 (1): 28.

LARGEN, M.J. & S. SPAWLS (2006): Description Acanthocercus guentherpetersi. – In: Lizards of Ethiopia (Reptilia Sauria): an annotated checklist, bibliography, gazetteer and identification key. – Tropical Zoology, Florence, 19 (1): 21-109.


Acanthocercus kiwuensis (KLAUSEWITZ, 1957)


Kiwu-Blaukehlagame / Kivu Blue-headed tree agama

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1957): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über die Rassenkreise Agama cyanogaster und A. atricollis. 2. Die Unterarten von Agama atricollis. – Senck. biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35: 157-174.


Acanthocercus minutus (KLAUSEWITZ, 1957)


Blaukehlagame / Blue-headed tree agama, Black-necked (Ridgeback) agama, Southern Tree Agama, Blue-throated Agama

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1957): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über die Rassenkreise Agama cyanogaster und A. atricollis. 2. Die Unterarten von Agama atricollis. – Senck. biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35: 157-174.


Acanthocercus phillipsii (BOULENGER, 1895)


BOULENGER, G.A. (1895): On the reptiles and batrachians obtained by Mr. E. Lort-Phillips in Somaliland. - Ann. Mag. nat. Hist., 1895 (6) 16: 165-169.

PERACCA, M.G. (1897): Sulla presenza dell’Agama Phillipsii, Blgr. Nella Colonia Eritrea. – Bollettino dei Musei di Zoologica ed Anatomia comparata della R. Universita di Torino, 12 (304): 1-2.

PETERS, G. (1982): Ein e neue Wirtelschwanzagame aus Ostafrika (Agamidae: Agama). – Mitt. Zool. Mus. Berlin, 58 (2): 265-268.


Acanthocercus yemensis (KLAUSEWITZ, 1954)


AL-JOHANY, A.M. (1995): The ecology of Agama yemenensis Klausewitz (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in south-western Arabia. – Journal of Arid Environments, 29 (4): 495-503.

A field study of the ecology of Agama yemenensis was carried out in Dalaghan National Park near Abha, Saudi Arabia. This lizard occurs in rocky areas of the highland in the south-west of Arabia. Emergence time, basking, thermoregu- lation and activity period have been determined. The body temperature of active lizards in the field is 29°C, while the selected temperatures in a thermal gradient during the day and night were 32·2°C and 26' 5°C , respectively. Lizards depend on a sit-and-wait strategy, and spend little time feeding on the ground. They feed mainly on ants which are very abundant in their habitat. Seeds, leaflets, twigs and other plant materials are also an important part of their diet .

PETERS, G. (1982): Eine neue Wirtelschwanzagame aus Ostafrika (Agamidae: Agama). – Mitt. Zool. Mus. Berlin, 58 (2): 265-268.


Acanthocercus ugandaensis (KLAUSEWITZ, 1957)


Uganda-
Blaukehlagame / Uganda Blue-headed tree agama

KLAUSEWITZ, W. (1957): Eidonomische Untersuchungen über die Rassenkreise Agama cyanogaster und A. atricollis. 2. Die Unterarten von Agama atricollis. – Senck. biol., Frankfurt/Main, 35: 157-174.